Introduction

Homework is anything that children do outside the normal school day that contributes to their learning in response to guidance from the school. Homework encompasses a whole variety of activities instigated by teachers and parents to support a child’s learning.

Aims and Objectives

The aims and objectives of homework are:

  • to enable pupils to make maximum progress in their academic and social development
  • to help pupils develop the skills of an independent learner
  • to promote a partnership between home and school in supporting each child’s learning
  • to enable all aspects of the curriculum to be covered in sufficient depth
  • to provide educational experiences not possible in school
  • to consolidate and reinforce learning done in school and to allow children to practise skills taught in lessons
  • to help children develop good work habits for the future

The Meadow and The Woodland Classes

In The Meadow and The Woodland Classes (Years R, 1 and 2) we encourage the children to read at home with their parents using both their reading treasure chests and high quality storybooks from home and school. Book bags are taken home and we believe that parents should read with their child daily. Parents then write in the Reading Diary so the class teacher can evaluate the child’s progress against the amount of reading experience. We explain clearly to parents how they can best support their child at this time in order to achieve the maximum benefit.

A list of homework tasks related to the class topic will be issued to Year 1 and 2 children at the beginning of each half term and the younger children may also request the homework tasks list. Children will have approximately six weeks to complete the tasks they have selected from the list; they may complete them in any order they wish. Children will bring homework to school as soon as it is finished and they are expected to complete the set number of tasks over the term.

In addition to this, the homework letter sent home each term also makes suggestions for mental maths activities/games which the children are encouraged to complete each term.

The Ocean Class

In the Ocean Class (Years 3 and 4) we encourage parents to ensure the children are reading regularly and to take an active interest in what they are reading. Some children will still need to read with their parents frequently (at least three times a week) and so then parents would complete the reading log in their reading journal. A confident reader may read to themselves and can then complete their own reading log. There is also a reading task set in the reading  journal each week for the children to complete. These are often related to what we are learning in class and encourage children to read for a purpose.

The children are expected to learn their times tables and there is a weekly test.

The children are told which they need to practise and are supported to do so in class, but further practise needs to be undertaken at home.

A list of homework tasks related to the class topic will be issued at the beginning of each term. Children will have approximately six weeks to complete the tasks they have selected from the list; they may complete them in any order they wish.

Children will bring homework to school as soon as it is finished and they are expected to complete the set number of tasks over the term.

The Mountains Class

In the Mountains Class (Years 5 and 6) we encourage parents to ensure the children are reading regularly and to take an active interest in what they are reading. Some children will still need to read with their parents frequently (at least three times a week) and so then parents would complete the reading diary. A confident reader may read to themselves and can then complete their own
reading diary.

A list of homework tasks related to the class topic will be issued at the beginning of each term. Children will have approximately six weeks to complete the tasks they have selected from the list; they may complete them in any order they wish.

Children will bring homework to school by three published deadlines; they are expected to complete at least three of tasks over the term.

Children will also be given a Times Table target which will be tested on a weekly basis. Children should practise their target Times Table to prepare for this test. This could include: writing out their times tables, computer based games, worksheets, practicing in the car/walking to and from school etc. For support and advice on this see the homework sheet or speak to the class teacher. Times Tables are an essential basic of Mathematical knowledge which many areas of mathematics build upon.  Children need automatic recall of these facts to ensure they are prepared for the demands of Year 5 and 6 Mathematics. They should recall facts in less than 5 seconds.

Great Rollright’s Rising Stars homework

All pupils take part in our Rising Stars Scheme. The emphasis of our ‘Great Rollright’s Rising Stars’ scheme is on the children having instant recall of maths facts i.e. they know them off by heart and do not need to ‘work them out’. This will give your child the very best foundation on which they can build and apply their other maths skills, such as Calculating, Problem solving, Shape and Space etc.

What is your role as parents for our Rising Stars Scheme?

Your child will bring home their ‘Rising Stars’ book with their target in which they will need to keep in their book bag. It is hoped that that you will help your child to achieve their targets by practising them at home in as many fun and creative ways as you can! Remember, maths is all around us, it is extremely important and it can be made fun and exciting as well!

Parental support in a child’s development is vital and so we encourage you to support your child by helping them to work towards their target and, as ever, we hope that you will ask your child’s teacher should you have any further questions or concerns.

The Role of Parents in supporting homework

Parents have a vital role to play in their child’s education, and homework is an important part of this process. We ask parents to encourage their child to complete the homework tasks that are set. We invite them to help their child as they feel necessary and provide them with the sort of environment that allows children to do their best. Parents can support their child by providing a good working space at home, by enabling their child to visit a library regularly, and by discussing the homework set with the child. Access to the internet can always be provided at school if parents have difficulties with this.

We ask parents to support and monitor the homework completed, to encourage the children to read at home regularly and also to write in the reading record where appropriate.

If parents have any problems about homework, they should, in the first instance, contact the child’s class teacher. If their questions are of a more general nature, they should contact the head teacher. Finally if they should wish to make a complaint about the school homework policy or the way it is implemented, they should contact the Governing Body.

We try to develop an understanding in our pupils of the benefits of homework. We want them to understand how it will extend their learning but also prepare them for the routines of secondary school. We promote homework through positive reinforcement. Parents have a crucial role to play in this process.

The Homework Policy is reviewed at least annually by the teaching staff in consultation with the pupils and the parents. It was last reviewed in September 2018.