Reading

EYFS and KS1:

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KS2:

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Our intent, implementation and impact statement for the teaching of reading.

Updated Intent, implementation and impact document for 2022-23 TBC

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As a school we have decided to produce our own termly reading newsletter which is packed full of reading ideas and useful information. They can be found here, alongside any other enrichment activities we take part in as a school related to reading.

You can find a useful list of ways to enjoy reading with your child by following this link – ten-top-tips

Writing

Updated Intent, implementation and impact document for 2022-23 TBC

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Spelling and Handwriting

Updated Intent, implementation and impact document for 2022-23 TBC

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Teaching Vocabulary

Spoken language is one of the main elements of the English Curriculum in Primary Schools. Speaking and Listening skills are vital to effectively communicating, leading to Reading and Writing. At Great Rollright, we passionately believe in the power of words. For this reason, we take a research-informed approach to ensuring our children develop a vast vocabulary of intentionally selected words.

Extensive evidence links educational outcomes with the breadth of a child’s vocabulary. See Feldman et al. (2005) for evidence that vocabulary size in infancy strongly predicts linguistic and cognitive abilities at four years and Marchman & Fernald (2008) for the same at eight years. In addition, vocabulary size is clearly linked to the acquisition of competence in reading (see, for example, Ouellette 2006; Snow, Tabor, Nicholson, Kurland 1995) and, in turn, to success in school (see, for instance, Biemiller & Boote 2006; Bornstein & Haynes 1998; Tymms, Merrell & Henderson 1997). 

We take a two-dimensional approach to vocabulary instruction based on the ‘Tier System’ developed originally by Beck (2013) in Bringing Words to Life.Vocabulary - Culturally And Linguistically Diverse Portfolio

Tier 1  words are common in this model and frequently seen in conversational language.

Tier 3 meanwhile, are very specific to a particular field, and whilst they are critical for gaining expertise in that area, they have less utility across a wide range of linguistic events.

Tier 2 are those words that sit somewhere in between. They are unlikely to be used in spoken language but appear regularly across various texts.

 

Our methodology targets the explicit teaching of both Tier 2 and Tier 3 words. Crucially, all students are exposed to the learning of Tier 2 and 3 words, including those still struggling to decode and undertaking additional phonics to help them catch up. The rationale for this is clear: Scarborough’s reading rope (2001) demonstrates that word recognition is only one element of reading, and therefore, we aim to develop all learners’ other aspects of reading as they receive extra support decoding. Every pupil is included in developing their vocabulary and, in turn, developing their other areas of comprehension. 

Recently, we have looked at how to develop Tier 2 vocabulary across the school. We have created a list of Tier 2 words teachers will teach their pupils.

Reception and Key Stage 1 

The Meadow and the Woodland words are taught through the Ruth Miskin ‘Talk through stories’ program. Lessons occur throughout the week that immerse the pupils in reading, understanding and using the word in various situations.

HOW TALK THROUGH STORIES WORKS

Talk Through Stories is for all children, especially those not from a language-rich home. It is designed to extend and deepen children’s vocabulary so that they can understand the books they will soon be able to read for themselves. Time is not on their side. That is why it has been so essential to plan specifically and systematically – step by step – to develop their vocabulary.

In Story Week, we help children get to know the story well: the plot, the characters, and their actions and motives.

In Vocabulary Week, we explore eight words from the story. These words have been specifically selected to develop children’s understanding of each word in the context of their everyday lives.

Key Stage 2

The Tier 2 words we teach are carefully selected by choosing high-quality texts that link to our curriculum. Teachers choose their Tier 2 language from these texts to seamlessly intertwine reading and vocabulary instruction. Although the texts relate to the curriculum, the words taught have the greatest scope of utility across various circumstances.

Each Guided Reading session begins with a precise sequence for vocabulary instruction. This sequence remains the same in every KS2 session because ‘the predictability of the format of your vocabulary rollout will both maximise your instructional time and increase student ownership. Habits lead to efficiency and, in this case, optimising the focus on studying words’ (Lemov 2016). The new word is introduced by displaying it on the board and is pronounced by the adult, followed by a call and response from the class. Students are then provided with a child-friendly definition, a picture that illustrates the word, and example sentences to understand how it is (and is not) used in context. New words are introduced in this manner, and as the adult presents each new word, they quiz pupils on the previous vocabulary (again, using whole class call and response to maximise participation). Pupils are then equipped with the knowledge of these new words they encounter in the text used in that session.

 

 

The Meadow and Woodland Tier 2 vocabulary lists

The Ocean’s Tier 2 vocabulary list 

The Mountain’s Vocabulary Tier 2

 

The measure of the children’s knowledge of the words taught can be categorised by

Stage 1: No knowledge

Stage 2: General sense: for example, enormous – ‘Does it have something to do with being big?’

Stage 3:  Narrow, context bound knowledge: for example, has knowledge of a word but not able to recall it readily.

Stage 4: Rich knowledge, decontextualised knowledge of a word’s meaning, its relationship to other words, and its extension to metaphorical uses